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USS S-40 SS 145
USS S-40 SS 145 coming along side a tender to moor.
Note radio mast from another S boats in foreground.

USS S-40 SS 145
USS S-40 SS 145 underway.

USS S-40
USS S-40 on Asiatic Station with two other S boats.
The submarine isn't diving.
Rough seas has caused the bow to plunge into the swells.
The exhaust from the diesel engines can be seen
on the hull just forward of the "40" on the hull.

USS S-40
USS S-40 in the foreground with an unidentified S boat.
Seas are pretty rough, note bow of submarine has lifted from the water.

USS S-40
USS S-40 in what appears to be getting underway from another S-boat moored to a tender.
Location is unknow but most likely Asiatic Station, Tsingtao, China, circa mid 1930's.


USS S-40
Bridge crew standing on the bridge combing watching the unmooring process.
Location is unknow but most likely Asiatic Station, Tsingtao, China, circa mid 1930's.


USS S-40
Captain and another officer standing on the bridge combing watching the unmooring process.
Bridge helmsman can be seen standing to the left of the legs of the officer on the left.
Location is unknow but most likely Asiatic Station, Tsingtao, China, circa mid 1930's.


USS S-40
Enlisted man and another officer standing on the bridge combing watching the unmooring process.
Location is unknow but most likely Asiatic Station, Tsingtao, China, circa mid 1930's.


USS S-40
Line handlers and foredeck officer on the bow of the S-40.
Location is unknow but most likely Asiatic Station, Tsingtao, China, circa mid 1930's.


USS S-40 radio masthead
Top of the radio mast showing detail of the mast and the commissioning pennent of the S-40.
Masthead lights and anchor lights can be seen under the yardarm.
Location is unknow but most likely Asiatic Station, Tsingtao, China, circa mid 1930's.


S-Boat radio masthead
Top of an S-Boat radio mast showing detail of the mast and flag halyards arttached to the underside of the yardarm.
Masthead lights and anchor lights can be seen under the yardarm.
Location is unknow but most likely Asiatic Station, Tsingtao, China, circa mid 1930's.


USS S-41 SS 146
USS S-41 SS 146

USS S-41 SS 146
USS S-41 SS 146

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Deck gun of the USS S-41 as seen through the portlight on the port side of the bridge access trunk. The dark overhang at the top of the photo is the bottom of the bridge structure. The sub has just dived and has reached a depth of about 20 feet under the surface of the ocean. Bubbles can be seen escaping from structures under the walking deck and ascending past the radio antennas. The view is looking at the Pointers position use to elevate the gun on the left side of the 4"/50 caliber gun.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 SS 153
Story relayed to Ron Martini from a crewman
"I served on the S42 in 1944 to June 1945 when we took her to Kaiser shipyard to decommission her.
The reason was when we were at sea out of San Diego practicing with the Air Force we dove and as usual we were to level off at periscope depth but we continued to go down.
I was a seaman first operating the bow planes and we could not control the dive. We reached 75 feet then 100 before the OD called the Capt. to the control room. We were pretty close to 150 ft when the Capt. ordered to blow all tanks and so we surfaced.
When we surfaced mo mac Gibbs, (MM or Motor Machistmate), port watch, volunteered to dive under the boat to ascertain the problem. When he surfaced he told us the stern planes had fallen off. We put into San Diego and were ordered up to Tiburon Bay and later to Kaiser shipyard where we decommissioned her.  From there I was transferred to the Dragonet (USS Dragonet SS 293) at Hunters Point, there I made Electrical Torpedoman 3 class.  Discharged in May 1946."
USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 SS 153 departing Pearl Harbor.

USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 had a shower head installed in the port side aft of the conning tower.
This photo was taken in 1926 off shore of Pearl Harbor.

This Photo is NOT in the Public Domain and is from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-42 SS 153
Close-up of the shower installed on the S-42 in the port side aft of the conning tower.
This photo was taken in 1926 off shore of Pearl Harbor.

This Photo is NOT in the Public Domain and is from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 had a shower head installed in the port side aft of the conning tower.
This photo was taken in 1926 off shore of Pearl Harbor.

This Photo is NOT in the Public Domain and is from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 shower in use. Water can be seen coming out of the showerhead.
Looks like some crew opted to shower "in the buff".
This photo was taken in 1926 off shore of Pearl Harbor.

This Photo is NOT in the Public Domain and is from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 shower in use. Crew member drying off after his shower.
Some crew opted to shower "in the buff" it seems.
This photo was taken in 1926 off shore of Pearl Harbor.

This Photo is NOT in the Public Domain and is from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The S-42 at an undisclosed location in Hawaiian waters the crew has caught a medium sized shark. It appears it was caught on a baited line with on a line with a light weight chain for leader. It also looks like the crew has used an other line with a grapple on it that is hooked under the exposed fin. Another crew man is reaching down with a boat hook to try and snag the fish.

What looks like a rope at the deck edge is actually a tow cable that these early submarines had permanently affixed due the unreliable engines of the time. It was run through the bullnose at the bow and then attached to the portside of the hull at deck level. We now know that the shark was caught on the port side of the submarine.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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The crew of the S-42 has managed to get a sling around the body of the shark and using the small boat/torpedo loading davit have hoisted the shark from the water. The photo was taken from the S-42's small boat that would have used the davit to be launched from it storage space under the walking deck.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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The shark caught by the S-42 crew is now suspended by the tail and displayed for the photographer who is in the small boat belonging to the S-42 and kept in below deck storage when not in use. The 4"/50 caliber deck gun can be seen behind the crew to the right in the photo. The towing cable can be seen running at the deck level below the feet of the men and behind the shark. The open hatch to the left leads down into the torpedo room. A folding camp style chair and be seen just to the right of the hatch. Note the screening placed in the superstructure limber holes to prevent sea creatures from entering and dying there when the submarine was on the surface and smelling.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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The USS S-42 hauled out on the marine railway at Pearl Harbor circa 1930's. There she had general upkeep and a man from the shipyard can be seen painting the hull. Other yard workers and a crewman can be seen in the center of the photo. The gun sponson can be seen bulging the superstructure with the conning tower above it.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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The USS S-42 hauled out on the marine railway at Pearl Harbor circa 1930's. She is getting a general upkeep. A Yard worker is painting the hull on the right side of the image. the photo is taken from outside the marine railway and looking at the port side of the S-42.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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USS S-42 at sea on a practice torpedo firing day. The crew is retrieving a fired exercise "fish" and has lifted it aboard. This torpedo weighs a ton and the men are in deep concentration moving it as it hangs above the deck, maneuvering it to be lowered below decks into the torpedo room. When they get back to port they will then pull it out and return it to the torpedo shop to be refurbished and used again, maybe by the S-42 or another sub needing to training its crews.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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Close-up detail of the above photo. USS S-42 at sea on a practice torpedo firing day. The crew is retrieving a fired exercise "fish" and has lifted it aboard. This torpedo weighs a ton and the men are in deep concentration moving it as it hangs above the deck. They are serious and paying attention to each other as the "tin fish" hangs, swaying above the rolling decks.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

USS S-42 crew Dutch harbor, AK 1943

USS S-42 crew Dutch harbor, AK January 1944. This is a photo of the change of command in Dutch Harbor Alaska.

The change was LCdr. Harley Kent Nauman ( far right front row) to Lt Charles Francis Leigh (to Nauman's right). Nauman went on to command the USS Salmon (SS-182).

John Allen, who supplied this photo is in the center, rear in the photo.



Identified Crew Are In The Center Of Each Close-up.
John Allen Dutch Harbor, AK 1943

John Allen
Miller QM3 Dutch Harbor, AK 1943

Miller, QM3
Shorty Howe Dutch Harbor, AK 1943

"Shorty" Howe
he Ship's Cook Dutch Harbor, AK 1943

The Ship's Cook
Lt Charles Leigh & Lt. Cmd. H. K. Nauman Dutch Harbor, AK 1943

(Left) Lt Charles Francis Leigh (new CO, was formerly the XO under Capt. Nauman)
&
(Right) LCdr. Harley Kent Nauman (old CO)

USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 SS 153
Interior shot of the helm and the high pressure air manifold to the left.
Photo courtesy of crew member John Allen
USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 SS 153 Bow from the Bridge.
Taken from the bridge looking forward to the bow, Milne Bay.
Photo courtesy of crew member John Allen
USS S-42 SS 153
USS S-42 SS 153 photographed from the deck of a neighbouring sub.
Dutch Harbor, Alaska 1943. Notice the sea and air search radars installed on these older boats.
Photo courtesy of crew member John Allen

The USS S-43 at sea off Hawaii circa 1930. The view is from the bridge of water coming over the bow. The caption in the photo album says: "Taken 'em' over the Bow & How!"

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

A view from the deck of the USS S-43 taking water over the bow, off the Hawaii circa 1930. There is obvious motion as the image is blurred and the deck is wet.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

Another image taken from almost the same location. Image is much clearer and good detail can be seen of the deck arrangement and hatches. The large spot is either a processing defect from who ever developed the film or maybe a drop of spray from wave action.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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A view looking back over the stern of the USS S-43 at sea off Hawaii circa 1930. You can see that the submarine is rolling due to wave action.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

Three of the S-43 crew on deck as the submarine returns to Pearl Harbor after some "daily ops". The third man is directly behind the man on the left only part of his head can be seen.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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Three of the S-43 crew on deck as the submarine returns to Pearl Harbor after some "daily ops". The third man is directly behind the man on the left only part of his head can be seen.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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The USS S-43 at Pearl Harbor circa 1930. In the background is the first US Aircraft carrier the USS Langley. Note the awnings to give men protection from the sun are rigged. These early boats did not have any air conditioning and were ovens in the heat.

US Navy Photo

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The USS S-43 at Pearl Harbor circa 1930 with 3 sailors posing around the the hatch that leads to the forward end of the engine room. In the background to the right is another submarine and it appears to be one of the early V boats, V1 thru 3. The man on the right appears to be a pipe smoker as there seems to be the bowl of a pipe sticking out of his jumper pocket.

The S-43 operated out of San Diego, with summers in Hawaii, from July 1927 until December 1930 when she was transferred to Hawaii and Pearl Harbor until 1941 when she and the rest of SUBDIV 11 were ordered to New London, Ct. Upon arrival in New London SUBDIV 11 was re-designated SUBDIV 53.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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The USS S-43 in dry dock, Pearl harbor, with the USS S-21 behind. Torpedo tube outer doors are open as well as various deck hatches. The barge seems to be office or berthing for the subs in the dry dock.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

The USS S-43 in dry dock, Pearl Harbor circa 1930. The rudders and stern planes have been removed to allow removal of the propellers. A crewman is standing in the upper rudder aperture. A good sense of scale for the size of an S class sub can be had from this image. Behind and in front of the man are the control rods for the rudder, (behind) and planes, (front).

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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The USS S-43 in dry dock, Pearl Harbor circa 1930. The rudders and stern planes have been removed to allow removal of the propellers. A tarp has been hung over a "soft patch" that has been removed from the hull to enable the removal and installation of equipment. From this placement it is probably an electric propulsion motor overhaul she is going through.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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Parts removed from the S-43 are laying in the bottom of the dry dock. At the top right I have pointed out the shadow from one of the propellers removed. If you check the light and dark markings on the blocking you can see that it matched the photo below. To the lower left is one of the stern planes or maybe it is the upper rudder. Just above that near the foot of the ladder may be the second propeller. Too indistinct to be certain.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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One of the two propellers removed from the USS S-43 while in dry dock. See the above image for the dock location of this propeller. The light and dark markings on the stack of blocks match the photo above.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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The USS S-43 in dry dock. The Stern planes and rudders seem to have been replaced. Several crew members can be seen in the photo.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

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On a sunny but blustery day on San Francisco Bay the USS S-43 makes trial runs and photo ops for the camera. With the Golden Gate Bridge behind and at least 15 mph of winds make for a dramatic photo.

US Navy Photo

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Having sailed past the camera boat the USS S-43 is heading towards what might be the Alameda Navy Base in the background.

US Navy Photo

USS S-43 at Mare Island Shipyard
USS S-43 SS 154 during a WW II refit at Mare Island Shipyard
January 25, 1944. Items circled in white show changes to design
made during the refit.

USS S-43 SS 154
USS S-43 SS 154

USS S-43  SS 154 at sea
USS S-43 under going sea trials in San Francisco Bay during a WW II overhaul
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

USS S-43 SS 154
USS S-43 under going sea trials in San Francisco Bay during a WW II overhaul
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

USS S-44 SS 155
USS S-44 SS 155
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

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Newspaper article from the "The Troy Register, March 28, 1925; The submarine S-44 struck a rock at the end of Conanicut Island, at the entrance to Newport Harbor, during a fog today, but was floated without assistance and made her way into h e harbor, apparently not seriously damaged.

The S-44, one of the new vessels of her type, was on the way to the naval torpedo station to take on her equipment of torpedoes when the accident occurred. She struck on one of the large rocks at The Dumplings (at) the southerly tip of Conanicut Island. (Southwest Point) The damage was to the bows of the submarine.

It was believed the craft got off her course somewhat because of the foggy conditions prevailing. Lieut. Arnold H. Bateman, Commander of the S-44, was awaiting orders from the Navy Department as to whether repairs should be made at Newport or the submarine should be taken to the base at N e w London, Conn.

Photo From Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection

San Diego Harbor in the 20's or 30's
San Diego Harbor in the 20's or 30's
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

Retrieving Torpedos in the 20's or 30's.
Retrieving Torpedos in the 20's or 30's.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

Underway off the California coast in the 20's or 30's
Underway off the California coast in the 20's or 30's
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

Repairs in the Canal Zone 1926
Repairs in the Canal Zone 1926. This may be one of the 2 main electric motors.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

Ships Company in the 1920's or 30's
Ships Company in the 1920's or 30's
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

Panama Canal Zone in Feburary 1943
Panama Canal Zone in Feburary 6, 1943
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

USS S-44 SS 155
USS S-44 SS 155 off the Philadelphia Navy Yard June 11, 1943

USS S-44 SS 155
USS S-44 SS 155 sporting her new radar, Feb 6, 1943 at
Coco Solo, Panama, the canal Zone

Philadelphia Navy Yard June 11, 1943
Philadelphia Navy Yard June 11, 1943
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

Capt Christie congratulates LCdr Moore
Official U.S. Navy Photograph
Captain Ralph W. Christie, USN, (left)
Commander Task Force 42 and Submarine Squadron Five Congratulates Lieutenant Commander John R. Moore, USN, Commanding Officer of USS S-44 (SS-155), " as he  returned to this South Pacific base after a very successful  week of patrol activity". (quoted from original World War II photo caption)
 The original caption date is 1 September 1942, which is
presumably a release date. S-44 returned to Brisbane,
Australia, on 23 August 1942 at the end of a war patrol in
the Solomon Islands, during which she sank the Japanese
heavy cruiser
Kako. The photograph was probably taken at about that time.

Gun Crews at drill January 1943
Gun Crews at drill January 1943. Note "kill" flags painted on the conning tower fairwater
Official U.S. Navy Photograph

S-45 dock side. circa 1920's
The USS S-45 dockside.
Location unknown. circa1920's


S-45 dock side. circa 1920's
The USS S-45 dockside.
Location unknown. circa1920's


S-45 dock side, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
S-45 dock side, Mare Island Naval Shipyard.
White circled areas show new equipment. October, 17, 1943

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

S-45 dock side, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
S-45 dock side, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
White circled areas show new equipment. October, 17, 1943

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

S-45 dock side, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
S-45 dock side, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
White circled areas show new equipment. October, 17, 1943

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

S-45 Mare Island Naval Shipyard Seatrials
S-45 Seatrials, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
October, 1943

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

S-45  Seatrials, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
S-45 Seatrials, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
October, 1943

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

S-45  Seatrials, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
S-45 Seatrials, Mare Island Naval Shipyard
October, 1943

Official U.S. Navy Photograph

USS S-46 SS 157
USS S-46 SS 157, Territory of Hawaii

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USS S-47 seen here leaving her nest at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in June of 1927. She and others of her squadron are being transfered to San Diego. The S-47 was going to Mare Island Naval Shipyard for some work prior to joining her unit at San Diego.

The submarines in the foreground are not identifiable though the sub on the right is one of the early V-Boats, either the V-1, V-2 or V-3.

The left hand S-Boat is judged, by her rounded bow plane fairing, to be one of the "30 series" of the S-Class boats. The only oddball to this was the S-19 and she is not known to have been at Gitmo in June of 1927.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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USS S-47 moored at Pearl Harbor circa late 1932. The S-47 was transferred to San Diego with her division in June 1927. There, she participated in individual, division, fleet, and joint Army-Navy exercises into 1932, which seems to have included at least one trip to Hawaii, before she returned to service at Panama. In this photo the escape training tower, completed in 1932, can be seen to the right. Moored with the S-47 are a number of other submarines. Based on the radio masts, there are probably six other "S" class submarines moored behind her.

Original Snapshot From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-47 SS 158
USS S-47 SS 158 September 1943, San Francisco Bay

USS S-47 SS 158
USS S-47 SS 158

USS S-47 SS 158
USS S-47 SS 158 September 1943 Mare Island Shipyard

USS S-47 SS 158
USS S-47 SS 158 October 1943, Mare Island Shipyard

USS S-48 SS 159 pre launch
USS S-48 SS 159 Pre launch photo, Feb 26, 1921
Lake Torpedo Boat Company Yards, Bridgeport, Conn.

USS S-48 pre launch photo
USS S-48 SS 159 Pre launch photo, Feb 26, 1921
Lake Torpedo Boat Company Yards, Bridgeport, Conn.

The back of the is photo has the Naval Photographic  Center caption:
(I have not changed the spellings)
26 Feb, 1921
S-48 Launched with real champagne by Indian Princess
An Indian Pricess as sponsor, a quart of real champagne for the christening and the assemblage of a distinguished company of foreign and American Naval experts were the outstanding features of the launching of the S-48, regarded as the "last word" in submarine construction. The S-48 contains many improvements over the orginal S type, she is double hulled and so constructed as to withstand the water pressure of 200 feet submergence. And is especially designed for protection against depth chargeshock. The radio apparatus is designed to work either under or above the water. Her battery will consist of five 21 inch torpedo tubes. Four foreward and one aft and one 4 inch gun. She is 24 feet long,(240 feet long), and has a displacement of 1,000 tons. The photo is a general scene before the launching.
Launched at Bridgeport, Conn.

USS S-48 SS 159 launch photo, Feb 26, 1921
USS S-48 SS 159  launching, Feb 26, 1921
Lake Torpedo Boat Company Yards, Bridgeport, Conn.


USS S-48 SS 159  post launching, Feb 26, 1921
USS S-48 SS 159  post launching, Feb 26, 1921
Notice the ice in the water.

USS S-48 SS 159  post launching, Feb 26, 1921
USS S-48 Launch day Feb 26, 1921

USS S-48 salvage work
Builder's trials were conducted on S-48 on the 7th of December 1921. During a dive off Penfield Reef, a manhole plate in one of the aft ballast tanks was left unsecured, and S-48 sank in 60 feet of water. The crew, contractor's personnel, and naval observers brought the bow to the surface and escaped through a torpedo tube to a tug which took them to New York. On 20 December, the submarine was raised and taken back to the builder's yard where repairs were begun. The work was completed ten months later; and, on 14 October 1922, USS S-48 (SS-159) was accepted by the Navy.

USS S-48 how crew escaped
USS S-48 Bow with salvage bracing in place on the number 2 torpedo tube outer door.
The crew broke in the inner and outer door interlocks to escape from the sunk submarine.


Photo courtesy of T. Gray Curtis
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The trial crew from the Lake Torpedo Boat Company is seen here as photographed for a newspaper story after their rescue from the sunk S-48. There is no indication which newspaper it may be as the photo was removed by Capt Austin and in his papers. All the mens names were listed for the photo but due to damage the last three men to the right on the top row have now been unreadable. Capt Austin had been the commanding officer of the USS G-2 during WW I.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

USS S-48 salvage almost complete
USS S-48 salvage almost complete

USS S-48 salvage almost complete
USS S-48 pulled to the surface by the salvage cranes.
The sub was towed back to Bridgeport, Conn. and the Lake Torpedo Boat Company where she was built.
The handwritten caption indicates that Simon Lake was in the photo but I haven't been able to locate him.

This Photo is NOT in the Public Domain and is from the Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-48 about the time of her commissioning
USS S-48 about the time of her commissioning, October 14, 1922.

S-48 dockside, possibly Portsmouth Harbor
The S-48 dockside possibly Portsmouth Harbor. 1922
Photo from the private collection of Ric Hedman

S-48 dockside, possibly Portsmouth Harbor
The S-48 dockside possibly Portsmouth Harbor. 1922
Photo from the private collection of Ric Hedman

S-48 dockside, possibly Portsmouth Harbor
The S-48 dockside possibly Portsmouth Harbor. 1922
Photo from the private collection of Ric Hedman

S-48 dockside, possibly Portsmouth Harbor
The S-48 dockside possibly Portsmouth Harbor. 1922
Photo from the private collection of Ric Hedman

S-48 dockside, possibly Portsmouth Harbor
The S-48 dockside possibly Portsmouth Harbor. 1922
The men have been doing laundry. It can be seen hanging on lines to the right in the background.
Photo from the private collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-48 wrecked on the beach
USS S-48 wrecked on the beach January 1925, the S-48 was salvaged a week
later and returned to service after repairs had been made. The USS S-48 was in and out of
commission up to WW II when she served as a training and target vessel.

S-48 conning tower
The conning tower of the S-48  taken while she was under going salvage, January 30, 1925.
US Navy Photo

slavage
Salvage successful. Early February 1925.
US Navy Photo

S-48 under tow
The S-48 under tow to the shipyard after salvage
US Navy Photo

Under tow
S-48 under tow by the tug Pennacook passing the Naval Prison
US Navy Photo

S-48 bow damage
February 8, 1925
Damage to the starboard bow plane and guards and to hull. Caption says this is looking fwd from frame 38.
The Starbord bowplane has been broken off and the plane guard is badly bent.
Circles are water spots on the negative.
US Navy Photo

S-48 in dry dock, 1925
February 8, 1925
Damage to sternplanes and propellers due to grounding. The starboard sternplane and propeller have been broken off.
There are several  other submarines in the dry dock but they are unidentified at this time.
US Navy Photo

S-48 dockside, possibly Portsmouth Harbor
The S-48 dockside possibly Portsmouth Harbor. Year unknown, circa late 1920's
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

Crew on an icey deck
Crew on an icey deck. They look to have just docked. The people aft of
 the conning tower seem to be bringing the brow over from the dock.
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

Crrew on deck
The crew seems to have gotten the brow on board. Another brow is laying on the dock at the left in the photo.
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

Lots of ice
Two crew members sranding on the foredeck of the S-48.
Possibly these men are the CO and XO of the S-48.
The clearing wire and radio antena are coverd in thick ice.
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

Really Cold!
Crew posing for camera. The deck gun is covered in thick ice.
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

Loading Mk 10 torpedo
Loading a MK10 torpedo into the foreward torpedo room.
Note the raised gunnels that gave the S-48 her graceful shape.
Another torpedo is resting on the deck to the left in the photo.
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

Ice, ice and more ice
Captain and XO sitting on ice encrusted conning tower fairwater.
The ammunition hoist for the deck gun is to the right in the photo on the deck.
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

Ice covered conning tower
Braving the weather to pose for the camera
Photo Copyright Ric Hedmanbr>
Officers and chiefs
The captain and XO,Lt. William N. Meyer, along with the chief petty officers of the S-48.
Circa late 1920's. Location unknown.
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

The Captian, name unknown at this time
The captain of the S-48. I haven't found out his name yet.
If you know please send me an email.
Circa late 1920's
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

The XO of the S-48, Lt. William N. Meyer
The XO of the S-48.
Lt. William N. Meyer. He was also the Diving officer
Circa late 1920's
Photo Copyright Ric Hedman

USS S-48 SS 159 March 1931
USS S-48 SS 159 March 1931
Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone
US Navy Photo

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An aerial view of the USS S-48 traveling through the Panama Canal. Which direction is not known. Her raised bulwarks on the fore deck are visible and crew can be seen sitting on the deck just aft of the radio antenna stanchion. Other crew can be seen on the aft deck. Maybe line handling parties, they may be approaching locks. circa 1931.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman, not a Navy Photo

USS S-48 July 1933
USS S-48 July 1933
US Navy Photo

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This crew photo is dated 1934 and appears to have been taken at Coco Solo where she was stationed at that time. In July 1933, she was assigned to the Rotating Reserve and in 1935 she was ordered inactivated. So she had periods where she was in active service and others when she wasn't. She seems to be actively manned and in service in this photo. The crew of 47 has taken the time to spread themselves around to be sure the submarines name is visible. The S-48 seems to be assigned to Squadron 5.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The man at the left seems to be a first class Radioman with more than 8 years active duty. He is also Qualified in Submarines as seen by the cloth dolphins sewn on his right sleeve below the elbow. The four men on the right are nonrated but the stripe around and under the right shoulder means they are qualified watch standers. The man in the front right is also Qualified in Submarines. The man just to the right of the radio mast has no stripe but his left sleeve is not visible so he may be rated. His right sleeve is not visible so it is impossible to tell if he is Submarine Qualified.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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Seven out of the ten men seen in this detail are submarine qualified. Two men are doubtful due the right forearm being obscured, one by a hand the other by the sleeve being pushed up. The man at lower right is not qualified at this point. We are unable to see what rates these men are.

The second man seated from the left is a First Class Petty Officer with over 8 years service but we are unable to tell what his rate is. In fact, we can not tell the jobs of any of these rated men.

The man at the top of the image is striking a pretty dramatic pose for the camera. He also seems to be maybe Hawaiian or Guamanian and at the time this was taken he would either be a cook or officers steward. People of "color" were limited as to what they were allowed to do in the post WW I segregated Navy.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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Two of the men in this detail can be identified by rate. The man second from the left is a third class Radioman and the third man is a Third class Torpedo man, both are Submarine Qualified.. The man at the far left is also Submarine Qualified but nonrated but is a qualified watch stander.

The next two men are qualified watch standers, one in the Engineering field. The man with the stripe around his left shoulder would have had a red not black stripe meaning he was striking for either Machinist mate or Engineman rate but not Submarine Qualified yet.

The next man is Submarine Qualified and also a qualified watch stander.

The last man is also Submarine Qualified but that is all that can be said.

One of the subs life rings with the subs name on it is hung on the side of the conning tower fairwater. The black canister probably hold a goodly length of line attached to both the life ring and submarine.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The man in the middle in the front row is a Second Class Torpedo Man and is Submarine Qualified. The other men with their right sleeves visible seem to not be Qualified yet. Two of the men in back are probably rated men and may or may not be Submarine Qualified.

The man to the left of the Second Class is either Japanese or Filipino and is most likely an officers steward, again, due to the segregation in the services created by President Wilson that persons of "color" were restricted in jobs they were allowed to perform.

The officer on the right is Submarine Qualified. He is wearing his gold plated Dolphins on his left chest. He is a Lieutenant Junior Grade indicated by the one wide and one ½ stripe on his shoulder Boards. The star next to the stripes means he is a "Line Officer" and can succeed to command of a vessel.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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This is the "Ward Room" meaning the officers who commanded the crew. The men are all Lieutenant Junior Grade except the man standing between the the 4 and the 8 who is a full Lieutenant and no-doubt the Commanding Officer. This is just a guess but we think the officer on the right is the XO, "Executive Officer" and the other two men are the Engineering and Navigation Officers. All are Submarine Qualified.

Seen on the side of the fairwater are several hinged panels noted by either the hinges themselves or the latching mechanisms.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The chief on the left next to the officer is a Chief Machinist Mate with more than 8 years service, Sub Qualified. The next chief is a Chief Torpedo-man, again, with over 8 years service and like wise Qualified. We can't say what the next chief is other than it is a left arm rate, maybe an Electrician. It is unknown.

The next man is a fireman striker noted by the stripe over and under the left shoulder. He is a qualified watch stander and Submarine Qualified.

The next man is a petty Officer and is Submarine Qualified. The badge on his right arm with the star above looks to to be "Gun Pointer / Gun Director First Class" badge that may mean the man is probably a Gunner's Mate and perhaps the Gun Captain for the S-48's 4"/50 Caliber deck gun.

The next man in the front row is a "hot running" Second Class Electricians Mate with no "hash marks" meaning he has made "rate" in under 4 years. We can't see his right arm to see if he is Qualified. The man directly behind is a First Class Electrician. The three hash marks mean over 12 years active service in the Navy and he has also Qualified in Submarines.

The man in the middle moved and is, unfortunately, blurred for posterity.

The next two men are Submarine Qualified. The to the left is a Third Class Petty Officer with over 8 years service. Rate unknown. The man on the right is a Second Class Machinist Mate with some time over 4 years active service.

Of the last two men in the second row, the man on the left is a firemen striker but that is just about all that can be found out from this photo. The man on the right is a First Class Petty Officer with over 8 years service.

The last two men in the third row are seen as a Third Class Petty Officer with over 8 years service and the other man is a fireman striker with a hash mark meaning over 4 years service.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-48 SS 159 March 1941
USS S-48 SS 159 March 1941
I had to rotate the photo to maintain the detail.
US Navy Photo

The S-boats covered such wide type of design and were built
around pre-WW I and post WW I design findings.



USS S-49
USS S-49 on sea trial shortly after launching.

USS S-49 June 1922
USS S-49 June 1922

USS S-49
USS S-49 January 1926.  The white in the picture is a large tear in the photo.

USS S-49 from the air
USS S-49 from the air, 1927

USS S-49 from the air
USS S-49 from the air, 1927

USS S-49 running at speed
USS S-49 running at speed

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The decommissioned submarine S-49 seen moored to the docks at a "The Texas Company" facility, most likely in Miami, Florida. Capt. F. J. Chrestensen, who purchased the submarine from Boston Iron and Metal Co. in Baltimore, Md. had his residence in Jacksonville, Fla. It would be a logical location to exhibit the submarine. She does not have the "C", seen here, painted on her bow in all the known photos of her so this may be an earlier image then the ones to follow. The Texas Company was to become TEXACO. The first oil company to have locations in all of the US states.

Seen just above the buildings in the center of the photo is a blimp. We can not tell if it is a civilian or Navy airship from this photo.

Photo In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The S-49 was decommissioned on March 21, 1931. This photo shows her at Washington DC being set up as a tourist attraction on November 1, 1931. She had just arrived from Trenton, NJ, via the Delaware River and the Delaware - Chesapeake Canal, Chesapeake Bay and the Patomac River to arrive at this destination. Her new owner and skipper for this voyage is 'Captain' Francis J. Chrestensen. According to the article the trip was made at 6 knots but it doesn't say if that was under its own power or under tow.

The sign reads; "Submarine Open For Inspection - Admission 25 cents - Children 15 cents". Chrestensen had hired a large crew of people to do tours and help maintain the submarine. a few of those are seen on the deck. A skiff can be seen lashed to the side of the submarine just to the left and below the conning tower.

Original Wire Photo In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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Another view of the the former USS S-49, identified as being on the causeway to Miami Beach, most likely at The Texas Company docks. Just a hint of a palm tree can be seen at the right edge.

The shore side railings are lined with large pictures some which show a submarine. The photos are probably designed to entice people aboard and tour the submarine. The man on deck may be Capt. F. J. Chrestensen, he does seem to be wearing some sort of an "official" looking uniform. Note loud speakers on top of the conning tower bridge. Note the Blimp just above the flag on the back of the submarine.

Photo In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

S-49 as a attraction, 1936

S-49 as a attraction, circa 1936. The "C" on the bow is to identify the submarine as a "Civilian" vessel. Submarine S-49 was owned and exhibited by Capt. F. J. Chrestensen and had no connection in any way with the United States Navy at that time. Capt. Chrestensen somehow purchased it from the Boston Iron and Metal Co. of Baltimore, Md. to whom she had been sold 1931 and was used as a private exhibit. She was reputed to have been painted yellow as well. She was taken back by the Navy in 1941 and sank while being used in testing operations when she sank off Point Patience in the Patuxent River on 16 December 1942 in 102 feet of water. She rests there still today.


USS S-49 SS 160
USS S-49 SS 160

S-49 Control Room
S-49 Control Room. Stern and bow plans controls are the large wheels.

S-49 engineroom
S-49 enginroom

S-49 torpedo room
S-49 torpedo room. The S-49 carried 12 torpedoes

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The S-49 "on the hard"at Point-O-Pines in Revere, Mass circa 1935. She is open for business as a tourist exhibit by Capt. F. J. Chrestensen who had purchased her from the Boston Iron and Metal Co.of Baltimore, Md. and towed her from place to place for profit. This and the below photo were taken at the same time as the man and woman on the deck are in almost the same positions in both photos.

On the hull below where the people on deck are standing can be seem the Fessenden Oscillator head. The round plate on the hull. This was a crude form of underwater communications device and could be used some what like a sonar.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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The S-49 "on the hard", at Point-O-Pines in Revere, Mass date is circa 1935. She is open for business as a tourist exhibit by Capt. F. J. Chrestensen who had purchased her from the Boston Iron and Metal Co.of Baltimore, Md. and towed her from place to place for profit. This and the above photo were taken at the same time as the man and woman on the deck are in almost the same positions in both photos.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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View from the beach of the S-49 beached at Point-O-Pines in Revere, Mass date is circa 1935. The number 1 torpedo tube shutter door is open. If you look close you can see a cable attached to the lower bow near the sand to keep the boat in place when the tide comes in and out.

National Archives Photo

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View from possibly another vessel of the S-49 beached at Point-O-Pines in Revere, Mass date is circa 1935.

National Archives Photo

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View from the bow of the S-49 at Windsor, Ontario, Canada, September 10, 1935. The men appear to be looking down the torpedo loading hatch. Loud speakers for [playing music or making announcements can be seen on the bridge.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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Original Navy Flat Hat with the U.S.S. S-49 ships Hat Band in place. These were later replaced by one that just said "US Navy" so as not to give away ships movements and identify crew. The writing, in bullion thread, has lost its gold color and is now quite dark and corroded. This is what some folks would call a "Donald Duck Hat" since it has a bow and forked ribbon "tail" barely seen in the photo's right side. The bow and tail are on the hats left side. Unlike later flat hats issued by the Navy that were unsupported this one has a wire stiffener holding the top of the hat tight thus making the top of the hat "flat".

Hat In The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-50 on launch day
USS S-50 on launch day, June 18, 1921
at the Lake Torpedo Boat Company, Bridgeport, Conn.

USS S-50, 1923
USS S-50, 1923

USS S-50, 1924
USS S-50, 1924

USS S-50, 1924
USS S-50, 1924
(circles seen at deck line are photographic defects)

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Other than the year it is not known where this photo was taken. Both the S-50 and S-51 operated in the same areas for a good portion of 1924. On January 4, 1924 both submarines left for the Canal Zone to participate in winter fleet maneuvers off Panama and in the Caribbean. During this cruise, they visited Trinidad, Guantanamo Bay, Culebra, and St. Thomas, V.I. After returning to New York on 30 April, they resumed type training off Block Island and in New England coastal waters.

Navy Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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Close-up view of the USS S-50. The bow of the S-51 can be seen on the left. From the way the men are dressed it could be supposed that this photo was taken some place on the southern cruise, though summer in New England waters is also possible..

Navy Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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Close-up view of the USS S-51. The bow of the S-50 can be seen on the right. From the way the men are dressed it could be supposed that this photo was taken some place on the southern cruise, though summer in New England waters is also possible.

Navy Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

USS S-50 SS 161
USS S-50 SS 161 S-3 is in the background

USS S-50, S-3 1925
USS S-50, S-3 1925

USS S-50, 1925
USS S-50, 1925

A posed picture on the deck of the USS S-50 SS 161 while
tied up at the New York Navy Yard in the mid 1920's.
The S-50 was decommissioned Aug 20, 1927.

USS S-51 0n launch day
USS S-51 0n launch day, Aug. 20, 1921.
Lake Torpedo Boat Company.
The flag says "LAKE" for the builder.

USS S-51 at sea
USS S-51 at sea, 1924.

USS S-51
USS S-51 SS 162

S-51 bow breaks water
S-51 bow breaks water during salvage of sunk submarine.

S-51 in dry dock
Dry dock is being pumped down. The hole in the hull can just
be seen foreward of the deck gun, port side

USS S-51 in dry dock
USS S-51 in dry dock after being salvaged.
The hole in the hull is on the opposite side of the hull just forward of the deck gun.

S-51 stern in dry dock
S-51 stern in dry dock

S-51 bow showing damage.
S-51 bow showing damage.

The caption says:
"Bow View Showing Damage to stern
Caused by Grounding On Man Of War Rocks"
Since this is the bow of the boat and the part that was damaged is known in nautical terminology as the 'STEM' I can only assume the caption writer misread the handwriting and not being familiar with the term wrote what he/she thought it said. Many thanks to Tara Guthrie for allowing me to use this photo from her S-51 memorial page to her Grandfather who died in the S-51 sinking.
Tara's page HERE

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A side view of the bow section of the salvaged USS S-51. The hull plating on the bow was torn away due to the salvage efforts and not a result of the sinking itself. The "9" in the circle is a sequence number of the photo. Two of the salvage lifting pontoons can be seen in this photo.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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A close-up view of the bow section of the salvaged USS S-51. The hull plating on the bow was torn away due to the salvage efforts and not a result of the sinking itself. The number 1 torpedo tube shutter door can be seen at the bottom of the photo.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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A close-up view of the bow section of the salvaged USS S-51. The bow planes on this class of "S-Boat" were below the water line and always "rigged out" so they protruded from the hull The sign painted on the side of the hull warned of the danger to submarine and passing vessel not to come too close.
The chain that looks like it belongs to the anchor is really part of the lift gear. It is attached to the cable seen running from the anchor up onto the deck. This cable was used as a "snubber" to prevent the chain from sliding off the hull. The chains were attached to the pontoons.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

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A close-up view of a workman on the deck of the S-51. He is coiling a rope or cable. One of the lifting pontoons can be seen behind him. He is standing just aft of the capstan used to raise the anchor or help put a purchase on a mooring line. Forward of the capstan is a water jug, there for the use of the men working on the salvage efforts. There are a number of planks laying across the deck behind the workman.

Photo From The Private Collection of Ric Hedman

S-51 hole in port side
S-51 hole in port side

Tender with S boats and Fleet boats 1940
USS Canopus with S-boats and early Fleet boats

Eight S-boats moored to a tender
Eight S-boats moored to tender
S-boat foreward torpedo room
S-boat foreward torpedo room

S-boat control room
Unknown S-boat control room.
Gyro is in the center of the room.

A peek
A peek through the door. Thought I could see something but no luck

Unknown S-boat control room
Unknown S-boat control room

Unknown S-boat engineroom
Unknown S-boat engineroom looking aft. Motor room is through the door.